November 2017 Wrap-up

I can’t believe I did a TBR post and I almost stuck to it!!!

At the beginning of the month I did a post about the books I was planning on reading and I never follow them. But I did!

This makes me happier than it should.

Literally, the first sentence in that post was: “I don’t know why I am doing this because I know I won’t be able to stick to it, but here I am again with another TBR.”

I’m going to stop talking about this and go on with the books I’ve read in the month of November!!!

by Sabrina Benaim


I really like it. Especially the parts about depression. I’m new at poetry and some of the pieces in this collection were difficult for me (as a newbie) to read. Next year, I really want to try to read more contemporary poetry. If you have recommendations, please let me know.

by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie


I loved “We should all be feminists” with all my heart and if possible, I loved this even more. This is an essay EVERY SINGLE PERSON SHOULD READ.
I wish my parents had given me these incredible suggestions when I was younger.
Now, as a 21 year old woman, I have come to the realisation that this is how I want educate my future children.

I’ve downloaded almost all of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s books and I’m planning on reading them all. Absolutely amazing.


by Benjamin Alire Saenz


I really liked “Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe” but this was even better.

Benjamin Alire Saenz’s writing is simple and clear and yet it conveys all the emotions and depth he wanted to impart on the reader.

This is a stoy about Sal, his relationships, his friends, his mexican-american family and his adoptive gay father. But it’s so much more than that. It’s about pain, faith, loss, abandonment and what struck me the most, was the friendships.

Saenz’s descriptions of the relationship in this book are so real. They are healthy, supportive, non-judgemental and unadulterated.

I truly adored it and I’d probably read it again in the future.

by Brit Bennett


I saw the lovely and adorable Mollie on Molliereads talking about this book and I HAD to read it.

And boy, am I happy I followed her recommendation.

I absolutely loved this book! I loved the writing and the story was just heart-breaking.
Within the first few chapters, I was immediately hooked.

This is the story of a small black community in South California and their secrets. Nadia Turner is a 17 year old girl that gets involved with the pastor’s son and gets pregnant. Nadia is dealing with a lot, her mother having recently comminted suicide, and so she decides to get an abortion. At the same time, she befriends Aubrey and the two become best friends. We see snippets of their lives as they grow old and become adults. The secrets they try to hide and the resentment and hurt that rips apart these characters.

It’s the “what if” dilemma that we all have had to deal with. The decisions we took as teenagers and young adults still have an impact on our adult life. But do we regret them? Are we still wondering “what if I had done this differently?” “What if this hadn’t happened to me?”.

All the grief, loss, love, betrayal and intimacy problems felt incredibly real and it truly break my heart.
And Nadia’s need for independence and distance from the small and narrow minded town resonated so much with me.

I really like it and wouldn’t mind reading it again.

Let me know what books you’ve read this months or if you have any recommendations!




Summer TBR 2017

Since I’ve started watching Booktube, I’ve so much more into reading. When I was in high school I spent so much time reading and taking notes that the last thing I wanted to do, was to pick up a book.

But now I have more time, I study literature at university and I wanted to deepen my knowledge of the book world. So I have decided that this summer I’m going to read as much as I can. I have compiled a list of books I want to get my hands on while at the beach for two weeks.

Let’s get into it!!

  • 12000020Aristotle and Dante Explore The Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz

I have heard such wonderful things about this book that I HAD to pick it up. It’s a story about love, family friendship and discovering oneself. Definitely a must! Also if you are interested, Lin-Manuel Miranda narrates the audiobook.

  • Emma by Jane Austen 6969

This is my third book written by Jane Austen and although “Sense and sensibility” was not really my favourite, I was interesting in this one. I know nothing about the plot so I won’t get spoiled.

  • 35118855The Burial Hour by Jeffery Deaver

I was supposed to get a physical copy of this book when I met the author last week but I didn’t. And you can read all about it here. I have been following him for YEARS and I HAVE to read this book as soon has possible. And it is set in Italy!

  • Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare12957

I read “Othello” for my university exam and I adored it. AND 6 years ago, David Tennant was Benedict in a modern version of the play, which I bought online because I was not able to attend. (It seems to be a recurring theme in my life). Anyway, I really wanted to read it again and then of course watch the play with David and the talented Catherine Tate.

  • 26893819The Girls by Emma Cline 

I know very little about this book as well. I have heard some people talking about it on booktube and then my aunt received it for her birthday. So we decided to buddy-read it this summer!

  • Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf14942

I was studying for my Uni exam and it made me realise that I haven’t read much literature. I have studied it in school and read some extract but almost never the entire book. So a couple of weeks ago in a tv game show there was a question about “Mrs Dalloway” and I decided to pick it up! I remember liking it in school so I hope I’ll enjoy it.

  • 28243032We Are Okay by Nina LaCour

I heard some people on Booktube talking about this book and it seemed like something I could be interested in. I know very little about what the book is about but I know that it deals with mental illness and LGBT issues. Many people have said they enjoyed it, so I definitely had to get it.

So here is my Summer/Holiday TBR… I can’t wait to get to the beach and lay under the sun for hours and just read, read and read.

Let me know whay you are planning to read this months and if you’d like to recommend something, I’m all ears! I’d love that!


Georgia 🙂 ❤

BookTube: An (almost) New-Found Love

Getting back into reading & Booktubers I Love

This is uncharted territory for me and I’m probably going to get something wrong.

Stupidly, I had never thought of YouTube as a place where you could talk about books and literature, but I quickly discovered how wrong I was.

If you think of YouTube as a platform where you can only watch challenges, beauty guros and guys playing video games in their bedrooms… don’t worry! I thought the same up until many months ago.

There is a whole community of people who love books and want to share their passion with others.

I started watching a few videos but quickly got bored. I hadn’t found the right people and I wasn’t actually interested.

But 6 or 7 months ago, I was checking when the lovely BeautywithEmilyFox was going to upload a new video and I discovered that she had just started a new channel all about books! I was intrigued and dived into the community.  Out of nowhere three channels popped out. They are all relatively new, but I have quickly watched a bunch of their video and I love them!!!

There are reviews, book recommendations, general tips for reading, hauls and book clubs!

For quite some time I have wanted to go back to reading. When I was little, I LOVED reading. I learnt when I was very young, even before going to school and throughout my academic years I started to read less and less.

I used to spend lots of hours at school and even more at home studying text books in the afternoon, so also reading at night (even for pleasure) was the last thing I wanted to do.

It’s been two years since I left school and now I have been feeling the urge to go back to actually enjoy reading. When teachers force you to read stuff you don’t like or you are not interested in, they make you HATE everything that has to do with literature. Especially because you will most definitely have to do a report or a review.

I’ll leave here the links to the YouTube channels I found and maybe (if you aren’t now) you will get back into it!


Jean Bookishthoughts


Mollie Reads

J. Bookish

You can also find their goodreads pages and add them as a friend! And if you have suggestions of books I should read or BookTubers I should follow, leave them in a comment!

Also, a bit of shameless promo, find me on!

Georgia    🙂



“Born a Crime” by Trevor Noah

I finished reading this book a couple of minutes ago and as soon as I turned over the past page (and I finished crying) I started typing this review.

As I wrote on my Goodreads page: ONE OF THE BEST BOOK I HAVE READ. EVER.

I’ve discovered Trevor Noah as a talk show host a couple of months ago and quickly fell in love with him. I watched a couple of this stand-up gigs on Youtube and when I discovered he was bringing out this book, I promised myself I would read it as soon as it came out.

And I’m so glad I did.

If you aren’t familiar with him, well… About a year ago, Trevor took over from Jon Stewart as host of “The Daily Show”, he is a comedian, he is from South Africa, he started doing stand-up when he was 18 and he was born a crime. trevor-noah-book-born-a-crime-stories-from-a-south-african-childhood

Trevor’s existence was illegal in South Africa: he was born in 1984 and apartheid was abolished in 1991. His mother is a black woman of Xhosa ancestry and his father is a swiss/german.

From his childhood and early adulthood, Trevor’s book teaches us about racism, apartheid and the multitude of problems of his country in an honest, genuine and heart-breaking way that is incredibly easy to follow.
When approaching this, you can’t think of him as the new host of “The Daily Show” or a celebrity, but just as a man from South Africa telling you this unbelievable story.
Trevor talks about apartheid, he explains to us reader (that like me aren’t particularly familiar with South Africa’s history) what it was actually like growing up in that time: the corruption of the police, poverty, church, faith, racism, feminism, equality and more. Trevor describes how difficult it was for him to identify in a specific group: is he black? is he white? Is he black enough? Is he white enough?

Young people should definitely read “Born a Crime”: this book could teach them a lot, not just about apartheid, but also about being a better person.

I can’t stress this enough: this book will be one of the best things you will read.
And a huge part of it, it’s because of Trevor’s mom Patricia. What an incredible woman.
Her life lessons included in the book are some of the best pieces of advice I have ever heard. She is such a strong and independent woman in a country that pushed against her as hard as it could. Her life story is amazing, inspiring and utterly heart-breaking.

I truly haven’t felt such passion for a book in a long time. Let’s just say that it made me cry. And I can count on one hand the number of times I have cried for a book.

I can’t really say this enough times: PLEASE, READ THIS BOOK.

While reading I underlined some of the best quotes in the book and I’ll write a separate post about them otherwise this one won’t ever end.

Now, go to the next bookshop and buy “Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood”. You won’t regret it.